Tag Archives: data science

Get Started With Kaggle – Description

Yesterday, I posted about the popularity of data hackathons. Well, today let’s get started with Kaggle. This is the first of a few simple posts about making your first submission to a Kaggle competition. I also promise you won’t be last place. You won’t be first either. This is an excellent way to start developing your data science skills.

The Problem

The Biological response competition seems to be a good starting point. The data is fairly straight forward. The data consists of rows and columns. Each row represents a molecule. The first column represents a biological response, and the remaining 1776 columns are features of the molecule (technically, calculated molecular descriptors). Unfortunately, the data does not specifically state what each column represents. Thus, domain knowledge of biology is not really helpful.

The Data

For this problem, Kaggle provides 2 sets of data. The first file is a training set. It includes data with responses and features. Obviously it is used for training your algorithm. The actual responses are either the value 0 or the value 1. The second file is very similar except it does not contain the responses. It is called the test file.

How To Submit A Solution

Your goal as a participant is to run your algorithm against the test file and predict the response. Each predicted response should be a value between 0 and 1. After your algorithm runs it should produce an output file with the predicted response for each row on a separate line. Your submission file is just a single column.

The Ranking

To submit a solution, you just upload your submission file. Kaggle then compares your predicted responses with the actual responses for the test set. Kaggle knows those values, but they do not share them with participants. The comparison method used for this competition is called Log Loss. For a description of Log Loss, see the Kaggle Wiki Page about scoring metrics. The goal of this competition is to get the lowest score.
Note: only 2 submissions are allowed per day.

You Can Do It

That is my brief description of a Kaggle Competition. It doesn’t sound too hard does it? Tomorrow, we can step through making our first submission. Go register for an account, so you are ready to submit a solution tomorrow. Be careful, once you start Kaggling (I think I just invented that word), you might not want to stop.

Data Science Training Program in New York

If you are in New York City or the surrounding area and you want to learn data science, this post is for you. General Assembly; a technology, design, and entrepreneurship campus in New York City; is running a 12-week Intensive Program in Data Science. The course consists of lectures (twice a week), labs, homework, and a comprehensive project. The instructors are Max Shron of OkCupid fame and Ryan Witt, founder of Opani. The course does cost $3000, but that seems like a fair price for the knowledge gain and a certificate.

Are you aware of any other training programs like this?

A Data Science Curriculum

This is not intended to be mapped to a set of college courses. It is intended to be a listing of necessary skills for a data scientist. For a definition of data scientist, see this previous post.

Mathematics

  • Calculus – not directly important to data science, but the knowledge is important to understand the statistics and machine learning
  • Matrix Operations

Statistics

  • Regression – Linear and Logistic
  • Bayesian Statistics

Tools

  • Hadoop
  • R – stats
  • Octave – machine learning

Computing

  • Basic Programming – Java, C/C++, and Python seem to be good language choices
  • Machine Learning
  • Database Knowledge – not limited to just relational databases

Communication

  • Data Visualization – how to make data look good: maps, graphs, etc
  • Presentation – story telling, be comfortable explaining data to others
  • Writing

Do you have anything to add/remove from the list?

Tell Someone About Data Science

Please spread the word about why data science is important. If you are excited, others will be too. If you are not sure what to say, here is a list of possible topics.

What can you tell people about data science?

What are some other things you could tell people about data science?

STEM Graduates Quit Because The Material Is Difficult

STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. Due to the difficulty of STEM degrees, it appears many students abandon the degrees in college. While this fact is not surprising, it is still concerning. Our country and world need more good people with STEM skills.

A STEM degree is not essential to becoming a data scientist, but many data scientists have STEM backgrounds. Thus, I thought this information fit well with the Data Science Education Week theme.

How do we convince students to not abandon the STEM degrees?

One solution is to put less emphasis on grades. Grades in STEM courses are typically the lowest on campus, and this causes some students to switch degree programs in order to get better grades. Second, tell young people about some of the cool STEM projects available. Lots of people in Science and Math work on really interesting projects. If you can, tell the world about your projects.

What are some other ways to keep students in STEM programs?

Below is a nice infographic with various numbers about STEM students.

Thanks to Online Engineering Degree for the infographic.